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Clandestinely Smuggled Reports on Nazi Germany

Deutscher Nachrichtendienst. With: Informationsblätter.

Prague: Verlagsanstalt Graphia und Paris, Vorstand der Sopade), August 30, 1934 – January 12, 1939. 44 issues (see below for details). Each ca. 30–60 numbered leaves printed rectos only on stock of varying color, including green and pink, staple-bound or sewn with thin thread. Ca. 9 × 6 cm to 12 × 15.5 cm. Very good.

Prague: Verlagsanstalt Graphia und Paris, Vorstand der Sopade), June 21, 1934 – August 12, 1939. 48 issues (see below for details). Each ca. 30–60 numbered leaves printed rectos only, staple-bound or sewn with thin thread. Ca. 10 × 6.5 cm to 21 × 15 cm. Very good.

A substantial run of two rare political journals published in exile by the directors of the German Social-Democratic Party in Exile (Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands), altogether comprising 92 issues and three additional items (see below). Both publications resemble the somewhat better-known “Deutschland-Berichte der Sopade” (divided into parts A and B), which were bound octavo volumes, whereas the present issues were produced quickly, cheaply, and in small sizes, with very small type and on thin paper, to be smuggled into the German Reich. The exile organization of the SPD gathered highly detailed reports from various parts of Nazi-governed Germany via “border secretaries” around the perimeter of the Reich, who were in touch with local opposition groups. These news were then disseminated back to various labor movement organizations and other resistance organizations. Touching on labor issues, the German economy, as well as the persecution of Jews and the situation in the Christian community, the reports served as an invaluable source for the activities of these organizations in combatting the National Socialist regime. They also serve as a resource for scholars today seeking to understand trends of popular sentiment in various parts of the Nazi regime. For an informative account of the reports, see Ian Kershaw, Hitler, the Germans, and the Final Solution, pp. 122–123.

Founded in 1863, the SPD was the first Marxist-influenced party in the German Reich, swelling to one of the most popular political forces from the 1890s into the early 1930s. It played a key role in the German November Revolution of 1918 and was crucial to establishing the Weimar Republic. After Hitler's rise to power, the party was banned and its leadership forced abroad, where it operated as Sopade (or SoPaDe) in Prague (1933–1938) and Paris (1938–1940), and afterwards in London. In 1934, the SPD issued the Prague Manifesto, penned by leading Sopade theoretician Rudolf Hilferding, which called for overthrowing Hitler's regime. Hilferding was also influential in directing the publishing activities of Sopade.

Also included are: 1) a printed sheet of the first six pages of the February 1936 issue in two variants: on paper and on silk; 2) Deutschland-Berichte der Sozialdemokratischen Partei Deutschlands (Sopade), vol. IV, no. 8 (August 1937), Octavo, original printed wrappers, comprising parts A (125 leaves) and B (36 leaves).
As of September 2021, KVK and OCLC show scant holdings of both periodicals outside Germany (partial runs at Amsteram and in Denmark). In North America, we only trace an unspecified run at the Hoover and two issues at NYU.

Informationsblaetter:

1934: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
1935: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
1936: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12
1937: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and one special issue
1938: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4-5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and one special issue
1939: nos. 5, 6, 7, 12 and an excerpt (special offprint)

Deutscher Nachrichtendienst:

1934: nos. 1, 3, 4, 9,
1935: nos. 2, 5 (June 1935), 5 (typo? January 1935), 6, 7, 9, 11, 12
1936: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
1937: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
1938: nos. 1, 2, 3, 4-6, 7, 8/9, 10, 12.

Book ID: 51522

Price: $9,500.00